Volgenau School of Engineering
George Mason University
George Mason University Mason
George Mason University

Welcome from the Chair

Dear students, parents, and friends of the department,

Welcome to Mason Engineering’s Department of Statistics, a department with a world-class faculty and rich academic programs.

Fortune magazine recently ranked an MS in biostatistics and an MS in statistics as the two best graduate degrees for jobs. Statisticians report being highly satisfied with their careers, and there is a proliferation of job opportunities for them because data and statistics are ubiquitous in every field and every company.

We offer degrees at all levels: a BS in statistics, an MS and a PhD in statistical science, and an MS in biostatistics. We administer a multidisciplinary MS in data analytics engineering. Plus, we have competitive research and teaching assistantships for full-time graduate students.

Our faculty members are experts in many areas of statistics including biostatistics, big data analytics, visualization, and government statistics.

On top of that, there are additional advantages to earning your degree at Mason. The Washington, D.C., area is the capital of statistics because of the number of statisticians who work for the federal government, the biomedical industry, and private companies. Our students have opportunities for internships, summer jobs, as well as employment after graduation.

We invite you to come to campus and meet our faculty and learn more about our programs and our research.

Sincerely,

William F. Rosenberger

University Professor and Chairman

Department of Statistics

George Mason University

Bill Rosenberger is chair of the statistics department.

William F. Rosenberger, university professor and chairman of Mason Engineering's Department of Statistics, works on improving clinical trial methodology to advance medical research with respect to efficiency and ethics.

"Statistics degrees are ideal for people who want challenging and interesting careers. What could be better than collecting and analyzing data from some of the most important studies that impact humanity. Statistics is important for all aspects of science, government, industry, and society.”

— William F. Rosenberger, University Professor and Chairman of the Department of Statistics

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